Accessible Page Links



Page Tools

Main page Content

History

creeker.JPGThe Creeker

It was 1994 and the old Mooloolaba Airport was being transformed. There was great excitement as a new high school was to be built to educate the hundreds of teenagers who now populated this once quiet, peaceful and previously undiscovered tropical paradise that was now Glenfields and Mountain Creek.

But not everyone was pleased. The new school was to be built on the banks of Mountain Creek, once a vibrant free-flowing stream originating in the western slopes of Buderim Mountain but now reduced to a mere trickle as canal developments drained away its energy and vitality. Its inhabitants were the kangaroos and wallabies that roamed the vast expanses that were now being transformed into the school grounds and the ducks and geese who every year reared their young away from the dangers of roving domestic dogs and feral cats.

And there were others who had escaped from the claws of rapacious developers in other parts who had made their homes beside the creek. There was a bear who had fled north from Bribie Island and a large shark who had narrowly avoided capture off Moreton Island. There was a mysterious tiger who had somehow made it to the mainland from Stradbroke and a majestic falcon who had emigrated south from the increasing bustle that was now Fraser Island.

 

They had all sought refuge on the banks of Mountain Creek after hearing tales of the mythical creature reputed to live there. Although no-one had ever seen him it was rumoured that he was a reclusive and shy being who had lived for decades in the dim and dark forest surrounding the lower reaches of Mountain Creek. Kindly and gentle, the Creeker (as he was called) was said to be the guardian of the creek - a warm, friendly and congenial fellow who protected all who came to seek safety in his creek-side haven.

As time passed the school grew. While the wallabies and kangaroos, the ducks and the geese withdrew further into the forest, the bear, the falcon, the shark and the tiger found new friends among the young people who now came to school each day. So friendly were they, that they came to be accepted as mascots for different parts of the school and made appearances at school sporting events to urge on students in their team games.

But still no-one had ever seen the Creeker.

But then it was that the student leaders, realising the fragile beauty of the creek, built a special place for the forest creatures. They called this special place the Millennium Woods. And it was here one day that they were overheard talking. They were bemoaning the fact that they were leaderless and needed a symbol not only of courage and perseverance but also of kindness and tolerance to give them direction. They needed someone to show the way, not just for part of the school, but for the whole school.

Hearing this, the bear and the falcon, the shark and the tiger relayed the tale of the elusive Creeker-the shy and reclusive protector of those in need.

So it was that they gathered in the forest to search for the Creeker: they to find a leader, the creeker to find new friends to protect and a new family to love.